頭を悩ます英文法?それでも挑み続けるべき理由! (Part 3)

この記事は日本語と英語で読めるものです。最初は英語で、その下が日本語翻訳。

英語力に応じて、読む順番をご自由にお決めください。


customerーservice.jpg

Ever felt befuddled by English grammar? Here’s a good reason to keep on trying!

(Part 3)

 

In the first two parts of this post on grammar, we saw that grammar is an expression of culture, and that when comparing Japanese vs. English grammar, the existence or absence, respectively, of a keigo system has a big impact on how native speakers relate to other people.

Now, let’s review two concrete examples of how these differences in perception play out in our daily lives!

 

Example 1: Customer Service

In many Western countries, good customer service is not assured. This might not necessarily be apparent to Japanese who travel abroad if they mainly visit touristy or luxurious places. But the fact is that in certain countries, for instance in France, what you pay for in a luxurious restaurant is service, because good service is not guaranteed.

One of the greatest things about living in Japan is that no matter who you are and where you go, you are guaranteed to be treated with kindness and deference as a customer. In my view, this is a result of the fact that “customers” are above in the relationship with the service provider. There’s no debate as to how you treat your clients!

In Western Countries, the rationale will vary. How you treat your customers is your own business decision. You may see them more as partners (equals) in that your transaction with them is a win-win situation; you might see them as friends or a community; or you might have no respect for them. Most people understand that it is not commercially viable to be rude to your customers, hence good customer service remains a beacon of good business practice everywhere. Yet, it is not guaranteed!  

Do you remember the awful way in which United Airlines got rid of one of their customers in an overbooked flight back in April 2017? The U.S. Transportation Department found that the airline had not committed any violation in doing so... Do you find this shocking? This would simply not be possible in Japan!

In conclusion, if you want guaranteed good customer service, by all means... fly ANA or JAL!

 

Example 2: The prerogative of being the boss or professor

Trying to work in a Japanese company can be highly nerve-wracking for most Westerners. The reason for this is how differently we deal with hierarchy depending on culture. Again, there are many variations among Western cultures (for instance, Southern Europe countries are mildly hierarchical societies, whereas Northern Europe countries are extremely flat).

Nonetheless, we can say that the existence of keigo in Japanese society means that the boss (or professor) has special status and authority over her employees (or students), in a way that is accepted by all parties. Basically, “If I tell you to do this, you must do this, because I am the boss, and you must respect your boss” is an acceptable rationale from a leader. That’s where problems arise if the employee doesn’t have the same cultural viewpoint!

 

For example, let’s say that a Japanese boss is giving an order to his French employee. France is a culture where people express negative feedback or opposition directly, and where people are generally defiant of authority. Here is how the dialogue might unfold.

Japanese boss: “After discussing with middle management, we’ve decided to implement a new reporting system. So please send a client meeting report to me after each individual customer meeting you have.”

French employee: “Well, I already keep you updated on client meetings in our weekly meeting, so I don’t see what value this additional reporting would add…”

Japanese boss, clearing his throat: “This is a decision we’ve made collectively at the middle management level.”

French employee: “But why? I’m already very busy. Are you sure this is an improvement?”

Japanese boss: “It is common sense. We need a paper track for future reference and information sharing between department.”

French employee: “Alright, alright.”

Here problems might arise because a Japanese boss is likely to expect her employee to accept what she says, whereas a French employee is likely to expect her boss to try and convince her of the benefits of the proposed change and to have a say in the discussion.

 

Culture and personal preferences play a large role in influencing our expectations toward communication, so whenever a problem arises, it is likely to stem from a gap in expectations. Our advice is to always ask people to try and formulate expressly their personal expectations whenever communication becomes problematic!

 

In the fourth and final part of this post, we’ll view another way in which English grammar modifies our expectations of proper communication: by putting the emphasis on the responsibility of the speaker.


customer-service.jpg

頭を悩ます英文法?それでも挑み続けるべき理由!

(Part 3)

 

文法についての本記事はじめの2パートでは、文法は文化の表れであること、また、日本語と英語の文法の比較にあたり、敬語というシステムの有無が、各言語のネイティブスピーカーが他の人とどう関わるかに強く影響を与えていることをお話ししました。

それでは、こうした認識の違いが日常生活にどう表れているのか、2つの具体例をみていきましょう!

 

例1:顧客対応

欧米諸国では大抵、いいカスタマーサービスを受けられる保証はありません。観光客向けの豪華な場所をメインに訪れるのであれば、日本人海外旅行者には必ずしもはっきりとはわからないかもしれません。しかし実際にいくつかの国、たとえばフランスでは、豪華なレストランで何にお金を払っているかというと、サービスに対してであり、それというのも確実にいいサービスが提供されるとは限らないからなのです。

日本に住む最大の利点の一つが、自分が誰であれ、どこに行こうとも、客として敬意を払われ親切な待遇が約束されていることです。これぞサービス業者との関係性においては「お客様」が上の立場にあるという事実の結果と私は考えます。自社の顧客をどう扱うかについて、議論の余地などありません!

一方、欧米諸国では、解釈は異なります。顧客をどう扱うかは、その会社の経営判断によります。Win-Winの取引関係という点で顧客をビジネスパートナー(同等の立場)と見なすこともできますし、友達やコミュニティのようにもとれるでしょう。あるいは、顧客に対してまったく敬意を示さないかもしれません。顧客に無礼であっては企業として存続不可能、というのは大抵の人がわかることであり、これ故に、質のいいカスタマーサービスはどこにおいても優れた経営手法の指標とされているのです。それでもなお、サービスは保証されてはいないのです!

2017年4月、ユナイテッド航空がオーバーブッキングされたフライトから乗客1名を降ろしたというひどい扱いを覚えていますか?米国運輸省によると、このユナイテッド航空の対応は何の違反もなかったとのことでしたが…衝撃的じゃないですか?こんな騒動、日本ではまずありえません!

結論として、確かなカスタマーサービスを求めるのであれば、是が非でも、ANAかJALを選ぶこと...

 

例2:社長や教授であることの特権、優位性

ほとんどの欧米人にとって、日本の企業で働くのは非常に気苦労が多いようで、その理由として、文化により組織内の序列への対処の仕方が違うことが挙げられます。さらに、欧米文化の中でもかなりばらつきはあります(たとえば南欧はややタテ社会的である一方で、北欧はきわめてフラットです)。

にもかかわらず、日本社会における敬語の存在が、社長(あるいは教授)が従業員(学生)に対して特別な地位や権威があることを示し、ある種そのことが誰からも受け入れられているといえます。根本的には、「私がこうしろと言えば、君はこうしなければならない、なぜなら私が社長で、そして君は社長に敬意を払うべきだからだ」というのはリーダー側の基準に沿った解釈です。従業員がこの社長と同じ文化的視点をもたない場合、ここで問題が生じてきます。

 

たとえば、日本人上司がフランス人社員に指示を出すとします。フランスは、みな否定的なフィードバックや反論を直接ぶつけ、人々は概して権力に反抗的な文化です。二者の会話はこんな風になるでしょう。

日本人上司: 「部課長会議の結果、新しい報告システムを実施することに決まった。今後は、各自顧客との打合せの都度、報告書を私に送るように。」

フランス人社員: 「あの、すでに週次ミーティングで随時状況は報告してるんで、わざわざ追加で報告書を書いても何も変わらない気がしますけど…」

日本人上司、 咳払いをしつつ: 「これは課長陣で集まって決めたことだから」

フランス人社員: 「でもどうしてですか?今もめちゃくちゃ忙しいんですよ。ほんとに業務改善になると思います?」

日本人上司: 「これが常識ってもんだ。のちの参照資料や部署間での情報共有のためにも、紙での記録がいるんだよ」

フランス人社員: 「はいはい、わかりましたー」

この場面、日本人上司は自分の言ったことを部下がすんなり受け入れるだろうと期待しているのに対して、フランス人社員は自分の提案のメリットを上司に納得させようと、課長会議での決定事項について口出しする権利があるだろうと思っているがために、問題が起こりうるのです。

 

文化や個人の嗜好というのは、コミュニケーションに対する期待の持ち方に大きく影響を与える要素となります。そのため、どんな場面であっても、こうした期待度のギャップから問題は生じる可能性があるのです。コミュニケーションがややこしくなってきた時には、相手が個人的にどの程度の期待をしているのか常にはっきり伝えてもらうようにすることをおすすめします。

次回、この記事の最終回となるPart4では、英文法が妥当なコミュニケーションを期待どおりには進めさせない点、話し手の責任を重視することについて考えていきます。